Recent Lovecraftian Books You Should Consider…

I’ve been sent a lot of Lovecraftian books to review lately.  This actually isn’t different from the norm… what’s different is that most of them are worth recommending, and I’m getting behind!  So here’s a list (though I will do separate review posts on most of these at a later date).

Click the titles for more information or to purchase the books.  As always, buying the books through these links supports The Lovecraft eZine.

Worlds of Cthulhu: Available at Amazon and at Fedogan & Bremer.  Editor R.M. Price has selected these sequels, “prequels” and interstitial tales, some of which are “Mythos” tales, and some not. Price introduces the book as a whole, as well as each story. Stories include “There Are Kings” by Richard Lupoff; “Envy, the Gardens of Ynath, and the Sin of Cain” by Darrell Schweitzer; “The Arcade,” by Will Murray; “The Chaos Blade,” by Adrian Cole; “Evacuation Day,” by Will Murray; “The Statement of Frank Elwood,” by Pete Rawlik; “The Testament of Alexander Fletcher,” by K.M. Tonso; “The Serpents of Tenoka,” by Ron Shiflet; “The Journal of Thomas Gedney,” by Pete Rawlik; “The Tower of Mormoroth,” by Gary Myers; and “The Signal Tower,” by Rafe McGregor. Dust jacket illustration by Gahan Wilson; endpaper illustrations by Tim Kirk.

A Pretty Mouth: I don’t think I’ve ever seen a book with all 5-star reviews on Amazon until now; and the blurbs on the Amazon page are out of this world.  Molly Tanzer’s stunningly original debut is unlike any tome you’ve ever encountered. Part reverse genealogy, part novel, part collection, part pastiche, it manages to be wholly original, by turns decadent, hilarious, erotic, and sinister. Imagine John Hughes directing an adaptation of a Gothic novel starring a young Rob Lowe opposite a younger Jeffrey Combs, or Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard cutting loose and collaborating on a picaresque, or Black Adder as envisioned by Roald Dahl, Angela Carter, Edward Gorey, and P.G. Wodehouse on an absinthe-bender, and you’re only scratching the surface of the weirdest, most audacious work to come down the pike in many a strange aeon. For fans of historical fiction, Victorian pornography, Mythos horror, Tom Jones, sword-and-sandal epics, Jeeves and Wooster, the poetry of John Wilmot, and boys’ school romps, *this* is the book you’ve been waiting for!

The Strange Dark One: By W.H. Pugmire; each tale is illustrated by Jeffrey Thomas.  W. H. Pugmire collects all of his best weird fiction concerning H. P. Lovecraft’s dark god, Nyarlathotep.  This avatar of the Great Old Ones is Lovecraft’s most enigmatic creation, a being of many masks and multitudinous personae. Often called The Crawling Chaos, Nyarlathotep heralds the end of mortal time, and serves as avatar of Azathoth, the Idiot Chaos who will blew earth’s dust away. Many writers have been enchanted by this dark being, in particular Robert Bloch, the man who, through correspondence, inspired Wilum Pugmire to try his hand at Lovecraftian fiction. This new book is a testimonial of Nyarlathotep’s hold on Pugmire’s withered brain, and these tales serve as aspects of a haunted mind.

Lovecraft Middle School: Professor Gargoyle: The is the first in the new Lovecraftian children’s series.  My son Logan and I read it together, and we both really enjoyed it.  If you’re looking for a way to ease your kids into Lovecraftian fiction, look no further.  Strange things are happening at Lovecraft Middle School. Rats are leaping from lockers. Students are disappearing. The school library is a labyrinth of secret corridors. And the science teacher is acting very peculiar – in fact, he just might be a monster-in-disguise. Twelve-year-old Robert Arthur knew that seventh grade was going to be weird, but this is ridiculous!  Professor Gargoyle (Volume I in the Tales from Lovecraft Middle School series) is full of bizarre beasts, strange mysteries, and nonstop adventure. It’s perfect for readers ages 10 and up. Best of all, the cover features a state-of-the-art “morphing” photo portrait – so you can personally witness the professor transforming into a monster. You won’t believe your eyes!

Space Eldritch: I really enjoyed this anthology.  Lovecraftian horrors through the lens of space travel.  Startling Stories meets Weird Tales in SPACE ELDRITCH, a volume of seven original novelettes and novellas of Lovecraftian pulp space opera. Featuring work by Brad R. Torgersen (Hugo/Nebula/Campbell nominee), Howard Tayler (multiple Hugo nominee), and Michael R. Collings ( author of over 100 books), plus a foreword by New York Times bestselling author Larry Correia, SPACE ELDRITCH inhabits the intersection between the eternal adventure of the final frontier and the inhuman darkness between the stars.  

Cthulhu Unbound 3: The third volume of the CTHULHU UNBOUND series plunges deeper than ever into daring new visions of H.P. Lovecraft’s universe in four all-new novellas by five masters of the new weird tale.  This is cosmic horror as you’ve never seen it before. This is the Mythos in many colors, many guises. This is Cthulhu Unbound!  UNSEEN EMPIRE: A half-Comanche bounty hunter tracks his diabolical superhuman quarry across the Wild West and into a lost subterranean city of madness and living death beneath the Oklahoma badlands.  MIRRORRORRIM: A desperate patient seeking answers in therapy sessions for self-mutilators discovers he is incomplete in ways he never could have imagined.  NEMESIS THEORY: A convict locked away in a maximum security prison has nothing left to fear, except the newest inmate: the man he murdered three years ago.  THE R’LYEH SINGULARITY: An Australian spy and a CIA operative join forces to uncover a global corporation plotting the new frontier of bio-weaponry research, using alien blood extracted from something lurking underneath the Pacific Ocean.  “Here is the latest flowering of the exciting new crop of genuinely new, genuinely Lovecraftian fiction. This is what I have been waiting for!”–Robert M. Price

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11 responses to “Recent Lovecraftian Books You Should Consider…

  1. All fine books indeed.. Molly is such a fresh new voice and of course any book from Mr. Pugmire is always welcomed.
    Each week in Lovecraft Eternal we review Mythos anthologies, novels and a random short story as well of course Lovecraft’s own fiction. Please share with the group.
    Very exciting about the long over due Worlds of Cthulhu. Great publisher.
    Cheers!

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  2. Thanks for the recommendations. A Pretty Mouth sounds interesting; too bad it doesn’t seem to be available in for the Kindle. I grabbed samples of several others though, and look forward to reading them!

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  3. I’ve bought both A Pretty Mouth and The Strange Dark One in PB but would *much* have preferred to have them on Kindle. But not sure what’s involved in putting out a Kindle edition. Unless you can DIY it maybe works out too expensive for many small presses.

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    • Actually while formatting it is a bit of work, it’s not much, and e-books are infinitely (potentially) profitable, because they don’t require physical shelf space and they can be endlessly copied. I don’t know why so many small-press publishers have been reluctant to join the e-book revolution.

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  4. Oh, Professor Gargoyle was wonderful (and one you will definitely want the physical copy to see the lenticular cover)! Adding a few of these others to my wishlist – those that weren’t already on it!

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  5. Pingback: Recent Lovecraftian Books You Should Consider… | The Site That Should Not Be·

  6. Guess I am the odd person here in that I prefer an actural book to hold and own. But thats just me. These books are all wonderful in any format.

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