5 new and upcoming Lovecraftian and Weird books

Here’s a short list of new and upcoming Lovecraftian books (and one that’s Weird).

As always, if there’s a Lovecraftian or Weird Fiction book newly available that I’ve missed, please email me: lovecraftezine@gmail.com .

Details and covers:

Purchase here: http://bit.ly/1QVV3zI

Purchase here: http://bit.ly/1QVV3zI

Rapture of the Deep and Other Lovecraftian Tales, by Cody Goodfellow: Cody Goodfellow has emerged as one of the most dynamic writers of neo-Lovecraftian fiction in recent years. This volume gathers the many provocative tales he has written over the past decade or more, including several novellas that lavishly expand upon core Lovecraftian themes and motifs. Chief among these, perhaps, is “In the Shadow of Swords,” strikingly set in Iraq, where American soldiers during the Iraq War encounter entities far more baleful than the terrorists of the Taliban. A similar setting is used in “Archons,” which features a denouement both horrific and poignant. Other stories play imaginative riffs on other Lovecraftian ideas. “The Anatomy Lesson,” set in the 19th century, is an ingenious take-off of “Pickman’s Model.” “To Skin a Corpse” transmutes the central idea of “Herbert West—Reanimator” into a gritty 1930s hard-boiled idiom. The key Lovecraftian notion of dreams is the basis of the pensive story “Broken Sleep.” And a spectacular and previously unpublished story, “Swinging,” employs “The Shadow out of Time” as the springboard for an extraordinary excursion into space and time.

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1L6w00a

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1L6w00a

The Ballad of Black Tom, by Victor LaValle: Charles Thomas Tester hustles to put food on the table, keep the roof over his father’s head, from Harlem to Flushing Meadows to Red Hook. He knows what magic a suit can cast, the invisibility a guitar case can provide, and the curse written on his skin that attracts the eye of wealthy white folks and their cops. But when he delivers an occult tome to a reclusive sorceress in the heart of Queens, Tom opens a door to a deeper realm of magic, and earns the attention of things best left sleeping. A storm that might swallow the world is building in Brooklyn. Will Black Tom live to see it break?

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1OqzVQ3

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1OqzVQ3

Lovecraft Country, by Matt Ruff: The critically acclaimed cult novelist makes visceral the terrors of life in Jim Crow America and its lingering effects in this brilliant and wondrous work of the imagination that melds historical fiction, pulp noir, and Lovecraftian horror and fantasy. Chicago, 1954. When his father Montrose goes missing, 22-year-old Army veteran Atticus Turner embarks on a road trip to New England to find him, accompanied by his Uncle George—publisher of The Safe Negro Travel Guide—and his childhood friend Letitia. On their journey to the manor of Mr. Braithwhite—heir to the estate that owned one of Atticus’s ancestors—they encounter both mundane terrors of white America and malevolent spirits that seem straight out of the weird tales George devours. At the manor, Atticus discovers his father in chains, held prisoner by a secret cabal named the Order of the Ancient Dawn—led by Samuel Braithwhite and his son Caleb—which has gathered to orchestrate a ritual that shockingly centers on Atticus. And his one hope of salvation may be the seed of his—and the whole Turner clan’s—destruction.

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1T22wTX

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1T22wTX

Furnace, by Livia Llewellyn: Horror fiction has long celebrated and explored the twin engines driving human existence. Call them what you like: Sex and Death, Love and Destruction, Temptation and Terror. While many may strive to reach the extremes, few authors manage to find the beauty that rests in the liminal space between these polar forces, the shuddering ecstasy encased within the shock. And then there’s Livia Llewellyn, an author praised for her dark, stirring, evocative prose and disturbing, personal narratives. Lush, layered, multifaceted, and elegant, the thirteen tales comprising Furnace showcase why Livia Llewellyn has been lauded by scholars and fans of weird fiction alike, and why she has been nominated multiple times for the Shirley Jackson Award and included in year’s best anthologies. These are exquisite stories, of beauty and cruelty, of pleasure and pain, of hunger, and of sharp teeth sinking into tender flesh.

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1PSSVuC

Purchase here: http://amzn.to/1PSSVuC

I Am Providence, by Nick Mamatas: For fans of legendary pulp author H. P. Lovecraft, there is nothing bigger than the annual Providence-based convention the Summer Tentacular. Horror writer Colleen Danzig doesn’t know what to expect when she arrives, but is unsettled to find that among the hobnobbing between scholars and literary critics are a group of real freaks: book collectors looking for volumes bound in human skin, and true believers claiming the power to summon the Elder God Cthulhu, one of their idol’s most horrific fictional creations, before the weekend is out. Colleen’s trip spirals into a nightmare when her roommate for the weekend, an obnoxious novelist known as Panossian, turns up dead, his face neatly removed. What’s more unsettling is that, in the aftermath of the murder, there is little concern among the convention goers. The Summer Tentacular continues uninterrupted, except by a few bumbling police. Everyone at the convention is a possible suspect, but only Colleen seems to show any interest in solving the murder. So she delves deep into the darkness, where occult truths have been lurking since the beginning of time. A darkness where Panossian is waiting, spending a lot of time thinking about Colleen, narrating a new Lovecraftian tale that could very well spell her doom.

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