“Forbidden Planet” and “At The Mountains of Madness”

Decades before “Forbidden Planet’”s theatrical run, Howard Phillips Lovecraft broke new imaginative grounds in “At the Mountains of Madness” (1931). Set in Antarctica, remote as the surface of the Moon in HPL’s day, he rewrote the deep history of the Earth in terms that disturbed our already crumbling anthropomorphic view of our prominence in the universe. There, he traced the irrational history of the primal world, often shrouded in religious myths and shamanic legends, in rational terms.

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“The Case of Charles Dexter Ward”: Will Immortal Human Beings enter the Pantheon of the Old Ones?

12 ways to prolong a human being’s life in the Lovecraftian Universe! Lovecraft portrayed a universe populated by ageless aliens — giants in comparison to human beings, who amount to little more than gnats. One means open to humanity — a way to establish parity with the Old Ones — is prolonged or eternal life.

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Lovecraft’s Cthulhu and Melville’s Moby Dick: “Cosmic Echoes from the Ocean Depths”

As Ishmael floats helplessly atop the ocean deep, he becomes the stuff of Cosmicism – a strikingly lonely image of humanity adrift in a universe neither good nor evil. Death ends their misunderstanding, and negates their madness. The true madness of man is that of trying to apply a reasonableness to an unreasonable cosmos.

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H.P. Lovecraft and H.R. Giger: “Was there a Madness to their Methods?”

Both Lovecraft and Giger dredged the hereditary memories of immemorial fear. Like the Grecian god Charon, they poled the haggard ferryboat to the dark underworld. Upon their return, each man captured in his respective mediums – Lovecraft in prose and Giger in paint – hints of the demons and dreamscapes that vibrate with life beyond the prosaic world.

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