Lovecraftian / Weird Fiction Author of the Week: Scott Jäeger

jaeger_dreamlandsWelcome to the ninth installment of my “Author of the Week”! Every Sunday, I post about a Weird Fiction and/or Lovecraftian author that I think more readers should know about. If you have suggestions, please email me at lovecraftezine@gmail.com .

This week’s author is Scott Jäeger.  His new book Dreamlands will be on sale for $2.99 beginning today (Sunday, October 26) through the end of Saturday, November 1, on both amazon.com and amazon.uk.  And his collection of Lovecraftian short stories By the Light of a Gibbous Moon is only 99 cents.  This is a hell of a collection for under a dollar.

I asked him five questions:

Please tell us about yourself — as much or as little as you’d like to say.

Thinking I wanted to be a writer, I went to college for Creative Writing after high school but dropped out when, after my first two years, I had learned nothing about actual writing. I did not end up pursuing writing full time. It can take decades to become a recognized author and people often don’t realize that some of their favorites, folks with eight or ten novels under their belt, still work a day job as their primary source of income. Instead I went to school for computer animation, another field I did not end up working in. In addition to self-publishing, I occasionally contribute 3D content and writing to indie computer games.

How and why did you begin writing?

As a boy I was very much a fan of fantasy and sci-fi. I was also something of an English nerd and the freedom of being a writer of long-form fiction appealed to me both as a career and as a way to be your own boss. In college, in addition to several short stories, I wrote a full length fantasy novel about two brothers separated early in their lives. One rises through the ranks in the military and the other becomes a rogue wizard studying the forgotten magic of an enemy race presumed extinct. A letter written to my favorite sci-fi author led to this novel being reviewed by an actual publishing house. They concluded that it was technically flawless, but unengaging.

What is it about Lovecraftian horror and Weird Fiction that appeals to you?

I first became interested in Lovecraft and his contemporaries when I was 14, and Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard remain two of my favorite authors. The uniqueness of Lovecraft’s world and worldview, of cosmic dread and a whole pantheon of horrors and otherworldly entities, is incomparable. The key to his fiction, and in my opinion the key to the best horror–period–has always been that which is not explained. Our own imaginations will always provide the most unsettling options for filling in those cracks. Dread, of the incomprehensible, of the fate worse than death, is what captures the reader.

Which of your books do you recommend that readers begin with?

My book of short stories requires less of a commitment, and is cheaper! Remember though that if you’re not satisfied with an eBook purchased through Amazon you can always get a refund, so it’s not really a risky purchase.

Would you list your Lovecraftian books?

Thanks to Scott for answering my questions!  And remember, Scott’s new book Dreamlands will be on sale for $2.99 beginning today (Sunday, October 26) through the end of Saturday, November 1, on both amazon.com and amazon.uk.  And his collection of Lovecraftian short stories By the Light of a Gibbous Moon is only 99 cents.  This is a hell of a collection for under a dollar.

(Previous “Authors of the Week”: Richard Gavin, Molly Tanzer,William Holloway, Brian Hodge, Elizabeth Bear, Don Webb, Nathan Ballingrud, Stephen Mark Rainey)

2 responses to “Lovecraftian / Weird Fiction Author of the Week: Scott Jäeger

  1. It is weirdly true that almost none of the authors trying to evoke Lovecraft actually succeed in doing so. When it’s historical they fail to bring up the concerns or subtle details and values that capture the period. When it’s cosmic, the plaster it all over the pages instead of hinting at it obliquely. When it’s about the horror, they fail to slowly increase the shadows of dread, usually skipping the shadows entirely and going straight to dread, which doesn’t actually scare anyone. I’ve read a lot of attempts, but Scott Jäeger is one of the very few who actually got it exactly right on all counts (though he does so using his own style). Well done!

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