Books I’ve recently added to the “Mike’s Recommended Lovecraftian Books” page

I finally had some time to add more books to the Recommended Lovecraftian Books page this morning.  Here are the new additions:

The Sea of Flesh and Ash, by Jeffrey Thomas and Scott Thomas – An incredible, amazing book.  I can’t recommend this one highly enough.  Brothers Jeffrey Thomas and Scott Thomas explore the haunted environs of their native New England – and alternate realms of existence – in two poetic and chilling short novels: An elderly woman lies dying in her hospital bed, beset by terrifying nightmares. A young Vietnamese woman begins to experience strange visions in which she is transported to a fog-shrouded alien world. An American research scientist is stalked by a menacing figure he calls The Crooked Man. Their destinies will mesh both in and out of dream, with dangerous consequences, in Jeffrey Thomas’ eerie dark fantasy The Sea of Flesh. A Victorian Englishman summons a strange puppet-like being to an old Colonial inn. A doctor returns from The Great War and discovers a mysterious naked woman at the edge of the Atlantic. A contemporary collector of arcane books retraces the steps of these other men – adventurers who sought out the mysteries of neighboring dimensions. Scott Thomas’ The Sea of Ash takes us along as three men from three different centuries experience the wonders and horrors of an unknown New England.

The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All – Short stories by Laird Barron.  Over the course of two award-winning collections and a critically acclaimed novel, The Croning, Laird Barron has arisen as one of the strongest and most original literary voices in modern horror and the dark fantastic. Melding supernatural horror with hardboiled noir, espionage, and a scientific backbone, Barron’s stories have garnered critical acclaim and have been reprinted in numerous year’s best anthologies and nominated for multiple awards, including the Crawford, International Horror Guild, Shirley Jackson, Theodore Sturgeon, and World Fantasy awards.  Barron returns with his third collection, The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All. Collecting interlinking tales of sublime cosmic horror, including “Blackwood’s Baby,” “The Carrion Gods in Their Heaven,” and “The Men from Porlock,” The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All delivers enough spine-chilling horror to satisfy even the most jaded reader.

Mountains of Madness – Edited by Robert M. Price.  This one’s not out yet, because… well, we’re all not sure why.  But you might want to visit the Amazon page and sign up to be notified when it does come out.  Because I have a copy, and I can tell you that this book is worth reading.  The frozen continent of Antarctica still harbors mysteries, slowly being revealed by intrepid scientists and by melting ice caps. The stories in this new collection offer more revelations still, as our frostbitten authors chip away at the legacy bequeathed by H.P. Lovecraft in his historic novella At the Mountains of Madness. Lovecraft’s epic is itself a continent teeming with lurking fears and horrors unknown. What mysterious entities did his star-headed crinoids serve? What genetic secrets gestated within the shifting masses of the unholy shoggoths? Can a mere human fathom or describe the thought patterns of such creatures? If the Elder Things survived, what further nefarious mischief might they have spread? Had there been other, earlier or later expeditions to the Lovecraftian tundra? Did the cyclopean metropolis of the Old Ones exist in this or some other dimension? Could there be unsuspected links between the Miskatonic Expedition and characters or events in other Lovecraft tales? What if The Twilight Zone had adapted At the Mountains of Madness for television? These are some of the icy secrets thawed out for our inspection by a team of parka-clad authors including: Stephen Mark Rainey, Joseph S. Pulver, Sr., Will Murray, Cody Goodfellow, Ken Asamatsu, C.J. Henderson, Edward Morris, Glynn Owen Barrass, Laurence J. Cornford, Pete Rawlik, Brian Sammons, and Pierre Comtois. These are guaranteed to be chilling tales in more ways than one!

Radiant Dawn, by Cody Goodfellow – THE BEGINNING IS NEAR… From a ruined chemical weapons bunker in Iraq to a shallow grave in California’s San Andreas Fault, the lines are drawn for a shadow war that will decide who, or what, will inherit the earth and reign as the next dominant species.  The escalating conflict engulfs the lives of three born survivors: a broken veteran of the Gulf War; a fiercely independent young nurse dying of cancer; and a brilliant novice FBI agent. Plunged into an arena where the stakes are survival or extinction, each must choose a side: between a militia of rogue government scientists and an enigmatic messiah who holds the cure for death itself, and the key to a new form of life.  Trapped in a genocidal war the government will do anything to conceal, where top-secret military technologies vie with the primal power of evolution unleashed, they will struggle to understand and stay alive…and stay human.

Ravenous Dusk, by Cody Goodfellow – The sequel to Radiant Dawn!  EVOLUTION IS EVOLVING… In the Seven Devils Mountains of Northern Idaho, in the radioactive shadow of Chernobyl, their numbers grow. They gather to be cured of their cancer, but they become much more. Soon, they will be One. When they come into their kingdom, all plant and animal life on earth will be rendered obsolete, and a billion-year old experiment called evolution will have reached its logical conclusion.

Reanimators, by Pete Rawlik – Two men, a bitter rivalry, and a quarter-century of unspeakable horrors. Herbert West’s crimes against nature are well-known to those familiar with the darkest secrets of science and resurrection. Obsessed with finding a cure for mankind’s oldest malady, death itself, he has experimented upon the living and dead, leaving behind a trail of monsters, mayhem, and madness. But the story of his greatest rival has never been told — until now. Dr. Stuart Hartwell, a colleague and contemporary of West, sets out to destroy him by uncovering the secrets of his terrible experiments, only to become what he initially despised: a reanimator of the dead. For more than twenty years, the two scientists race each other to master the mysteries of life . . . and unlife. From the grisly battlefields of the Great War to the haunted coasts of Dunwich and Innsmouth, from the halls of fabled Miskatonic University to the sinking of the Titanic, their unholy quests leave their mark upon the world — and create monsters of them both.

The Light is the Darkness, by Laird Barron – Conrad Navarro is a champion of the Pageant, a gruesome modern day gladiatorial exhibition held in secret arenas across the globe. Indentured by a cabal of ultra-rich patrons, his world is one of blood and mayhem, an existence where savagery reigns supreme while mercy leads to annihilation. Conrad’s sister has vanished while traveling in Mexico. Imogene, a decorated special agent for the FBI, was hot on the trail of a legendary scientist whose vile eugenics experiments landed him on an international most-wanted list. Imogene left behind a sequence of bizarre clues that indicate she uncovered evidence of a Byzantine occult conspiracy against civilization itself — a threat so vast and terrible, its ultimate fruition would herald an event more inimical to all terrestrial life than mere extinction. Now, Conrad is on the hunt, searching for his missing sister while malign forces seek to manipulate and destroy him by turns. It is an odyssey that will send this man of war from the lush jungles of South America, to the debauched court of an Aegean Prince, to the blasted moonscape of the American desert as he becomes inexorably enmeshed within a web of primordial evil that stretches back unto prehistory. All the while struggling to maintain a vestige of humanity; for Conrad has gazed into an abyss where the light is the darkness, and he has begun the metamorphosis into something more than human.

Fatale – Secrets, lies, horror, lust, and monsters from the time before time all collide in Fatale: Death Chases Me. In present day, a man meets a woman who he becomes instantly obsessed with, and in the 1950s, this same woman destroys the lives of all those who cross her path, on a quest for… what? Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ bestselling series will leave you craving more!  (Book one – Book two – Book three)

Nocturnes – Short stories by John Connolly.  I can’t recommend this short story collection highly enough.  Not every story is Lovecraftian, but several are, and any horror fan will enjoy every story in this collection.  Bestselling author John Connolly’s first collection of short fiction, Nocturnes, now features five additional stories — never-before published for an American audience — in a dark, daring, utterly haunting anthology of lost lovers and missing children, predatory demons, and vengeful ghosts. In “The New Daughter,” a father comes to suspect that a burial mound on his land hides something very ancient, and very much alive; in “The Underbury Witches,” two London detectives find themselves battling a particularly female evil in a town culled of its menfolk. And finally, private detective Charlie Parker returns in the long novella “The Reflecting Eye,” in which the photograph of an unknown girl turns up in the mailbox of an abandoned house once occupied by an infamous killer. This discovery forces Parker to confront the possibility that the house is not as empty as it appears, and that something has been waiting in the darkness for its chance to kill again.

Howard Lovecraft and the Frozen Kingdom – After visiting his father in Arkham Sanitarium, young Howard Lovecraft ignores his father’s warning and uses the legendary Necronomicon to open a portal to a strange, frozen world filled with horrifying creatures and grave danger. Alone and scared, Howard befriends a hideous creature he names Spot who takes him to the castle of the king where he is captured and sentenced to death.

Occultation and Other Stories – Short stories by Laird Barron.  He returns with his second collection, Occultation. Pitting ordinary men and women against a carnivorous, chaotic cosmos, Occultation’s eight tales of terror (two never before published) include the Theodore Sturgeon and Shirley Jackson Award-nominated story “The Forest” and Shirley Jackson Award nominee “The Lagerstatte.” Featuring an introduction by Michael Shea, Occultation brings more of the spine-chillingly sublime cosmic horror Laird Barron’s fans have come to expect. 

Neonomicon – Comic book legend Alan Moore (WATCHMEN, FROM HELL) and brilliant artist Jacen Burrows deliver a chilling tale of Lovecraftian horror!  Brears and Lamper, two young and cocky FBI agents, investigate a fresh series of ritual murders somehow tied to the final undercover assignment of Aldo Sax –the once golden boy of the Bureau, now a convicted killer and inmate of a maximum security prison.  From their interrogation of Sax (where he spoke exclusively in inhuman tongues) to a related drug raid on a seedy rock club rife with arcane symbols and otherworldly lyrics, they suspect that they are on the trail of something awful… but nothing can prepare them for the creeping insanity and unspeakable terrors they will face in the small harbor town of Innsmouth.  NEONOMICON collects Alan Moore’s 2010 comic book series for the first time in its entirety – including his original story, THE COURTYARD, which chronicled Aldo Sax’s tragic encounter with the (somewhat) mortal agents of the Old Ones!

The Encyclopedia Cthulhiana: A Guide to Lovecraftian Horror, by Daniel Harms – Since Lovecraft’s time the Cthulhu Mythos has grown exponentially, until it has become increasingly difficult to keep track of, even for devoted fans. Many writers have contributed to it, including Robert E. Howard, Robert Bloch, Brian Lumley, and Stephen King. This book is the first major attempt in many years to provide a comprehensive guide to H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos.  The second edition of Encyclopedia Cthulhiana contains over a hundred and fifty additional pages and scores of new entries. New features includes thumbnail illustrations of the most important signs and symbols (see sample, left) and a timeline of the Cthulhu Mythos spanning billions of years. Many entries have been revised to reflect our latest understanding of the Mythos, and the infamous Necronomicon appendix has been greatly expanded. Also present for the first time is “A Brief History of the Cthulhu Mythos”, which examines the evolution of the genre from the 1920s to today.  A Great Resource for Call of Cthulhu players!

One response to “Books I’ve recently added to the “Mike’s Recommended Lovecraftian Books” page

  1. Last I heard, the “Mountains of Madness” book had been delayed due to contract stuff. For some reason it was briefly available on Amazon back in, what April? I got a copy, then heard from some folks in a Facebook group that all contracts had not been signed and it was not supposed to be released yet. I think it’s a pretty good book, hope it becomes available again soon!

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